Re:Legend farms the likes of Monster Rancher and Stardew Valley – and Malaysia – for inspiration


Re:Legend checks every box for a certain kind of gamer: It’s got monster-raising, farming, crafting, and fishing. It smashed through a bevy of goals on the crowdfunding site Kickstarter, pulling in $630,700 in Singapore dollars (that’s $463,967.25 U.S.). The original goal? $70,000. The enthusiasm was more than enough to eclipse the platform goals: It’s coming to PC, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, and the Xbox One.

Not a bad start for Magnus Games, a two-person studio in Malaysia.

A few weeks ago, I dialed up Magnus cofounder Dong Chee Gan – DC as many know him – and chatted about Re:Legend. In addition to running the studio, DC works on storyboards, environment backgrounds, and game design for Re:Legend. We dove into what inspired this enticing mix of Monster Rancher and Digimon, Stardew Valley and Rune Factory, and, well, anything that ever had a fishing minigame.

Here is an edited transcript of our interview.

GamesBeat: Why are you making Re:Legend?

Dong Chee DC Chan: We’re gamers since we were young. We have a lot of ideas, and we’ve tried to make those fit in the game. We do everything, from sketches to storyline, everything. We don’t really rest. If we’re having dinner, if we’re in the shower, we’ll run out and say, hey, I had this idea, I think we can implement this. We’ll start writing it down.

GamesBeat: How big is your team?

DC: We started as the two of us. Now we have six, and we’re still expanding. We hope to get more people, because we really don’t want to underdeliver on the game and the promises we have for our audience.

GamesBeat: One of my favorite old games is called Mail Order Monsters

DC: Yeah, the dinosaurs?

GamesBeat: You take giant monsters and buy items for them and fight them in an arena. And I never played Pokmon. I played Monster Rancher instead.

DC: Yeah, Monster Rancher is one of the big inspirations for us.

GamesBeat: I know that games like Rune Factory and Digimon also play a role here. Did you play Stardew Valley?

DC: Stardew Valley wasn’t as much of an influence. We played Harvest Moon a lot, Rune Factory, Monster Rancher, stuff like that. Those were the main inspirations.

GamesBeat: How long have you been working on Re:Legend?

DC: We started two years ago. We faced some financial issues, because our investors have their own problems, and they backed out. We were left helpless. We had a lot of problems. People were asking us what we should do next. My brother and I had to stand up and tell the team that we would find a way to solve these problems.

After a few months of dilemma, we decided to start a new company together with the same team and the same idea we have in mind, Magnus Games. We started developing the game from scratch. We changed the whole direction of the art starting last year.

Above: Farming is thirsty work.

Image Credit: Magnus Games

GamesBeat: One of the little monsters is called Magnus. Is there a connection there, since the company is named Magnus and your brother’s named Magnus?

DC: Magnus is a Latin word that means strong, great. We were thinking that naming the monsters as something that’s good and strong and can help you along your journey – that’s why we picked the name. We googled a lot and looked at a lot of different names and how they came up with them – Pokmon from Pocket Monsters, Digimon from Digital Monsters. We did a lot of brainstorming and we were thinking, OK, the company is called Magnus Games, so we’ll just call it Magnus.

GamesBeat: You have investors, and you have your Kickstarter backers? Did you go to Kickstarter to gauge interest and see if people would want to buy a game like this?

DC: We do need the funding, because before this, we used to have investors, but they pulled out due to their own financial issues. We didn’t want to give up on the project, so we continued, and that’s why we turned to Kickstarter. We finished our Square Enix Collective campaign in April. We’d gone too far to stop, so we wanted to continue the project, and we thought that Kickstarter would be a good place to get funding and build an audience that’s interested and get back some confidence for the team. The world is waiting, so we won’t give up. We’ll believe in what we’re doing and keep going.

Magnus spokesperson: Did we tell you about the Square Enix Collective campaign?

GamesBeat: No, what was that?

Spokesperson: That was the first step in engaging reception and interest. It did so well there that it was an early sign of interest in the game.

DC: We were trying to get some proof of concept earlier on. We were showcasing it on the Square Enix-it’s an indie platform for indie companies. We tried it out there and got a really good response. We got 99 percent upvotes. Basically we broke every record for the history of Square Enix Collective. So we knew we had to make the game. We’d gone too far to back out and stop development.

GamesBeat: Are you looking for more funding after this, as your Kickstarter money seems like only so much for a game of this scope?

DC: Because we’re from Malaysia-there are different exchange rates and different wages for different countries. It might be all right. But we’re still open to working with different publishers. We’ve been approached by some publishers, but we’re still negotiating and talking about some of the deals they’re offering with the team.

GamesBeat: When Re:Legend launches, will it be on Steam first, or another platform?

DC: We’ll start on Steam, but luckily enough, we just hit our stretch goal for Nintendo Switch, and we have a few thousand left for PS4. We’ll start on Steam and continue to porting it over to Switch. If we hit the stretch goal for other platforms we’re definitely porting it to other consoles as well.

GamesBeat: Considering how hard it is to get found on Steam, I’ve noticed that some indies are going to Switch first, and then to Steam. The Switch has a smaller player base, but it’s much easier to find things.

DC: Yeah, we did think about that, but our team is not so much in the business-we’re not looking for money. We’re looking to complete the game first on PC. It’ll be easier for us to port it to consoles later. We just want to finish the game and share what we’ve played in our younger days. The quality of the game is what we want to produce. That’s our main point.

Spokesperson: It’ll depend on future publisher deals and whatnot too. It’s worth saying that they’ve gotten tremendous support from the Switch community. A bunch of Nintendo fan sites have been all over this.

Above: Caught ’em!

Image Credit: Magnus Games

GamesBeat: How important is fishing to this game? I see fishing stuff all over the place.

DC: Fishing is really, really important, because in fishing, you’re not only fishing, but you have to put them in your own fish farm. They’re different sizes, and you need them to travel around. It’s an island, so to travel to some other places, some mysterious places, you need to breed and cultivate your own fish that are large enough L size or XL size so that you can ride them and off you go to explore the ocean, places like other islands. That’s very important to the game.

GamesBeat: Why did you decide fishing would be about both catching and raising fish?

DC: We love simulation games from when we were young. We were thinking, everyone’s doing fishing. Harvest Moon had a fish farm, but you’d just get a fish and dump it in your well. I can’t remember which title it was, but it was definitely one of the Harvest Moons. You’d breed the fish in your well, but you couldn’t see them. There were just more fish. We wanted to take that to another level, where you could catch fish and breed different sizes and cultivate them. Maybe you could find a mystery egg that would hatch into a Magnus underwater.

MS: It helps bridge into a bunch of features, because it’s also a game where you can go out and explore a lot. Having this fish-raising mechanic allows you to use those fish and explore the islands. I’ve been describing this game as a sort of all-encompassing simulation RPG, because it does so much, but I think it’s really fitting that raising these fish then allows you to engage in so many more features. There’s a screenshot I love where the character is surfing on the manta ray.

Continue Reading …

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Research on how the ‘weapons effect’ can induce aggressive behavior around guns is riling people up on the left and right

playing video games violent video games grand theft autoCate Gillon/Getty Images

The psychologist behind a new experiment that suggests that watching movies that feature guns can lead children to play with and try to fire a found firearm says he’s accustomed to his research sparking outrage from both the gun-rights and media worlds.

Brad Bushman,an Ohio State University psychologist and media studies professor, has spent years studying the weapons effect how the presence of a gun can induce aggressive behavior or thoughts.

The effect has been identified in situations with virtual guns, like video games, or real ones, like those a driver might carry while on the road. In experiment after experiment, Bushman has found that guns can prime people to act aggressively.

Bushman said his research reliably antagonizes typically conservative gun owners, since his findings suggest that the mere presence of weapons can lead to aggression. It has also prompted criticism from typically left-leaning movie producers and video game developers, who bristle at the implication that their work could be responsible for violence.

Gun owners hate me and video game players hate me, Bushman said. His new study,published Monday intheJournal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics, will likely piss off both gun owners and the movie industry, he said.

In the paper, Bushman and co-author Kelly Dillon said they found that children ages 8 to 12 shown a PG-rated movie featuring guns were more likely to handle a disabled .38 revolver left in a toy room than those who viewed a version of the film with weapons edited out -and that those who had seen the movie were much more likely to pull the trigger.

The report says that children who saw weapons onscreen pulled the trigger a median 2.8 times and held the gun for a median 53.1 seconds. One child who had viewed the movie with guns put the disabled firearm to another child’s head and pulled the trigger. Another pointed the weapon out of the lab window at people on the street.

Kids who didn’t see the movie with guns held the found firearm for a median 11.1 seconds – and many didn’t touch it at all, or immediately alerted a research assistant. Most did not attempt to pull the trigger.

There are three takeaways from my experiment, Bushman explained. One, don’t let your kids watch gun violence in movies or TV. Two, for the movie industry, ask why there are warnings for alcohol and tobacco but not guns. Three, for gun owners, secure your guns.

shooting rangeTheBlaze via Youtube

The weapons effect has been identified in experimental settings by academics since the late 1960s, but the idea is controversial.A 2009 review of literatureon the subject found thatwhilethe experimental evidence for a ‘weapons effect’ is robust, the phenomenon has yet to be generalized to real world scenarios.

Other psychologists, like Duke University’s Jeffrey Swanson,cast doubton the significance of media influences as a sign of future violence in comparison to other risk factors like past antisocial or violent behavior.

When the state of California used evidence from research on the weapons effect to defend a law restricting the sale of violent video games to children in a 2010 Supreme Court case,Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association, the majority of justices found it unconvincing.In his majority opinion,Antonin Scalia wrote that conclusions were based on correlation without an explanation of causation, and the outcomes deemed more aggressive seemed insignificant. He noted skeptically that one experiment in which children were judged more violent after playing a video game, they used a d rather than an r to fill in a blank in the word explo_e.

Film industry groups like the Motion Picture Association of America have not yet responded to Bushman’s latest research. Video game writers have argued that Bushman’s similar past research shows an unfamiliarity of just who creates and enjoys violent media, and why they do so.

On the blogTechdirt, Tim Cushing wrote that Bushman is the go-to man for talking heads who want their own perceptions of Big Bad Video Games confirmed.

The NRA has called weapons-effect research dubious and journals that publish papers on the topic uncritical – even as it has lobbed attacks against filmmakers for glorifying gun violence. At the NRA’s 2016 annual meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, its leader, Wayne LaPierre,slammedHollywood media elites who back gun control while simultaneously dousing our kids with reckless, gratuitous, irresponsible gun play.

The group is not immune to the charms of big guns on the big screen, though. This May, itsAmerican Riflemanmagazinedevoted a two-page spreadto the prop gun used by the actor Bradley Cooper in the 2014 Chris Kyle biopicAmerican Sniper, which was ratedrated Rfor strong and disturbing war violence.

Bushman said he’s accustomed to skepticism. The closest scrutiny comes from his own editors at academic journals, he said.

NOW WATCH: Animated map shows what would happen to Asia if all the Earth’s ice melted

How to Engage With Your Social Media Followers Quickly and Authentically

How do you feel when people comment on your social media posts?

Awesome, right?

A comment is or some form of engagement is usually a sign that people love your social media content. And it’s important to reciprocate and respond to these interactions.

But at the same time, engaging with your followers can be time-consuming. If you are a solo social media manager or a small business owner, you know you don’t have the whole day to engage with your followers.

So how can you minimize the time it takes to engage with your followers and still be authentic at the same time?

In this post, we’ll share the tactics and tools we use to engage with our amazing social media followers quickly and authentically.

How to Engage With Your Social Media Followers Quickly and Authentically

5 creative types of replies you can use

If you have been replying to comments and mentions with a thank you, that’s a great first step. But it can be easy to fall into the habit of using a few standard replies. I’m definitely guilty of that!

There are many ways you can spice up your replies, show your brand’s personality, and delight your followers. Here are some that I like:

1. Questions

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Instead of a simple Thank you, I love to engage with the person further and continue the discussion. A great method is to ask for her or his opinions on the topic.

For example, if someone commented on your social media post that links to a blog post, you could ask the following questions:

  • What is your favorite part of the blog post?
  • What’s your main takeaway from the blog post?
  • Do you agree with the idea mentioned in the blog post?
  • How has your experience with (a strategy or tool) been like?
  • Have you tried any of the tips in the blog post before? If yes, how did it go?

If they reply to your questions, that’s awesome! You can continue the conversation and build a good relationship with them.

2. Emojis

Emojis in replies

The easiest way to make your replies a little more fun is to include emojis.<img src="http://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72×72/1f64c.png&quot; alt="

PC Gaming Weekly: Atari searches for a market


Thanks to an exclusive report from our lead writer, Dean Takahashi, we learned this week that thenew Ataribox will be a low-cost gaming rigwith Atari branding and style.

The Ataribox will run on the Linux OS and feature an AMD processor. Yes, you’ll be able to play PC games on it, too – remember, Steam does work on Linux. That’s a nice bonus for people who are interested in this box.

But let’s remember – Valve itself threw its weightbehind living room Linux gamingwith Steam Machines. When’s the last time you heard anyone talk about those? And when was the last time you hooked up your PC to your main TV and used Steam’s Big Picture mode?

Yeah, I thought so. Atari’s hoping the nostalgia from old games will move boxes,as it did for the NES Classic. But why would I need to buy a $250-$300 device for that? I can play the publisher’s classic games on Steam for $10. I can buy one of those other cheap setup boxes that you see at Target.

And who has so much nostalgia for old arcade games that they’d shell out that sort of money for a box under their TV instead of just making their ownMAME emulator cabinet?

For PC gaming coverage, send news tips toJeff Grubband guest post submissions toRowan Kaiser. Please be sure to visit ourPC Gaming Channel.

-Jason Wilson, GamesBeat managing editor

P.S. Let’s all pile into the blue bus and intoFornite’s Battle Royale mode, which became a free-to-play this week.

From GamesBeat

Shapeways lets fans make 3D-printed custom toys based on Valve games

Shapeways and Valve have teamed up to allow fans to make and sell 3D-printed toys and other objects based on Valve’s game franchises and hardware. The program grants content creators a license to create 3D-printed objects based on Valve’s games, includingDota 2, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive,Team Fortress 2, and Portal, as well as its entertainment hardware[]

How indie studio Accidental Queens emerged from a game jam

French developer Accidental Queens’s debut title A Normal Lost Phone was its first indie success, selling 100,000 copies and earning accolades from critics. But cofounder Elizabeth Maler says that they didn’t set out to form a game studio nor did they expect that so many people would receive A Normal Lost Phone so warmly. Rather,[]

Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250

EXCLUSIVE: Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin[]

Intel believes WiGig will be a viable option for wireless high-end VR

Intel showed off a demo this week of WiGig wireless networking technology that can connect a high-performance PC with a wireless virtual reality headset, providing a new option for doing VR without the annoying cables. The WiGig technology, which uses a short-range 60-gigahertz radio, can transfer data at fast enough rates to feed VR imagery[]

Twitch broadcaster turns single-player Darkest Dungeon into a co-op game

FEATURE: Why face the sanity-breaking horrors of Darkest Dungeon alone when you could use the buddy system? For over a month now, livestreamer and YouTube creator John Wolfe has been playing the role-playing gameDarkest Dungeonwith three other friends, effectively turning a single-player game into a multiplayer co-op. He runs it like a campaign ofDungeons & Dragons,[]

Comparing more Battle Royale shooters: PUBG vs. Fortnite vs. H1Z1

PlayerUnknown’s Battlegroundsis on the cusp of defining the future of shooters for the next few years, but it’s not the only name in the emerging Battle Royale-shooter genre. PUBG is a massive hit with more than 11 million copies sold and the record for the most concurrent players at any one time on Steam, but[]

Beyond GamesBeat

Valve Removes Nearly 200 Fake Games from Steam

According to Polygon, of the 173 games removed from Steam a majority of them were developed by Silicon Echo Studios, or its supposed alias Zonitron Production. Silicon Echo apparently churned out about 86 gamesin two months, many of which were apparently the same game but under a different name. Valve has severed all business ties with the studio, and operations under Silicon Echo running different names.(via US Gamer)

In-a-Gadda-da-Procgen: Generating Procedural Flowers

My current pet project, Bestiarium, might never be finished. That said, its core idea is trying to make the exploration of procedural generation meaningful, and that’s pretty hard. This is why it’s at least a fertile ground for tons of little prototypes and experiments and in the search of meaning and fun, I end up on weird places like procedural organ generation, which in itself is super fun, but searching for references on google images is not the most pleasant part of the experience. Maybe this is why I ended up going for something lighter this time: flowers.(via Gamasutra)

We understand many Persona fans would love to see a PC version

Persona 5 is a wonderful PlayStation 4 and PS3 game but it is not available on PC. You can play it on PC, however, via emulation. Well, you could. The RPCS3 emulator was yesterday hit by a legal threat from Atlus, maker of the game. More specifically, it was RPC3 maker Nekotekina whose Patreon page was hit by the DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) takedown request, threatening the whole operation.(via EuroGamer)

Striking Voice Actors Didn’t Get Everything They Wanted, But It Was A Start

After a year of striking, countless career sacrifices and some thorny negotiating, the video game voice actors of the Screen Actors GuildAmerican Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA) finally came to a tentative agreement with the 11 struck game game companies last night. Without some big demands met, it’s easy to consider the tentative agreement a disappointment. Looking at the specifics, though, it’s clear that SAG-AFTRA’s small victories indicate steps forward in an industry that certainly isn’t known for its progressive labor practices.(via Kotaku)

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How to Engage With Your Social Media Followers Quickly and Authentically

How do you feel when people comment on your social media posts?

Awesome, right?

A comment is or some form of engagement is usually a sign that people love your social media content. And it’s important to reciprocate and respond to these interactions.

But at the same time, engaging with your followers can be time-consuming. If you are a solo social media manager or a small business owner, you know you don’t have the whole day to engage with your followers.

So how can you minimize the time it takes to engage with your followers and still be authentic at the same time?

In this post, we’ll share the tactics and tools we use to engage with our amazing social media followers quickly and authentically.

How to Engage With Your Social Media Followers Quickly and Authentically

5 creative types of replies you can use

If you have been replying to comments and mentions with a thank you, that’s a great first step. But it can be easy to fall into the habit of using a few standard replies. I’m definitely guilty of that!

There are many ways you can spice up your replies, show your brand’s personality, and delight your followers. Here are some that I like:

1. Questions

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Instead of a simple Thank you, I love to engage with the person further and continue the discussion. A great method is to ask for her or his opinions on the topic.

For example, if someone commented on your social media post that links to a blog post, you could ask the following questions:

  • What is your favorite part of the blog post?
  • What’s your main takeaway from the blog post?
  • Do you agree with the idea mentioned in the blog post?
  • How has your experience with (a strategy or tool) been like?
  • Have you tried any of the tips in the blog post before? If yes, how did it go?

If they reply to your questions, that’s awesome! You can continue the conversation and build a good relationship with them.

2. Emojis

Emojis in replies

The easiest way to make your replies a little more fun is to include emojis.<img src="http://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.3/72×72/1f64c.png&quot; alt="

The Ideal Cover Photo Size for Each of the Major Social Media Platforms

One of the first few things people see when they visit your social media profiles is your cover photo.

Whether it’s your Facebook Page, LinkedIn Company Page, or YouTube channel, your cover photo is the biggest image on the page. And people will see your cover photo even before they see any of your posts.

So how do you make your cover photo show up the exact way you want it to be?

One of the key factors is the size. Without the correct dimensions (width and height), your cover photo might be cropped to fit the space available and people will miss the important details on your photo.

While there isn’t a one-size-fits-all cover photo size for all the social media platforms, the information is out there.

We’ve collected all the answers here so that you can have a single point of reference for all cover photo sizes.

The Ideal Cover Photo Size for Each of the Major Social Media Platforms

The best cover photo size for all major social media platform

Some social media platforms display cover photos slightly different on the desktop and on mobile. But in general, here are the ideal cover photo sizes for the platforms with a cover photo.

(Feel free to click on a social media platform to see more details for that particular platform.)

Facebook 820px x 462px (Profile, Page, and Group), 820px by 465px (Page video),1920px by 1080px (Event)

LinkedIn 1584px x 396px (Profile), 1536px x 768px (Company Page)

YouTube 2560px x 1440px

Twitter 1,500px x 500px

Google+ 1600px x 900px (Profile and Page), 368px x 207px (Collection and community)

Tumblr 1600px x 900px

If you spot an error or an outdated information, I’m be grateful if you could let me know in the comments section below. Thanks!

Section separator

Ideal cover photo size for Facebook

Facebook profile cover photo 820px x 462px

Facebook profile cover photo

The ideal size for your Facebook (personal) profile cover photo is 820 pixels wide by 462 pixels tall. According to Facebook, your cover photo has to be at least 720 pixels wide.

There are four important details to take note of when creating a cover photo for your Facebook profile:

1. Your cover photo will look slightly differenton mobile.

On mobile, Facebook shows your cover photo at a different dimension – slightly taller or narrower. Facebook will either show more of your image if your image is tall enough or crop the sides away.

From my tests, 820 pixels wide by 462 pixels tall is an ideal size for both desktop and mobile. Facebook will show the blue section on the desktop and both the green and blue sections on mobile.

Facebook cover photo template

You can grab a Photoshop file of this template here.

2. You can reposition your cover photo on the desktop.

In case you have any important details at the top or bottom of your cover photo and you worry that Facebook will crop them away on the desktop, Facebook allows you to reposition your cover photo by dragging it up or down.

Drag Facebook profile cover photo

3. Your profile photo, your name, and a few buttons overlay your cover photo.

As you might have noticed in the example above, several things overlay the cover photo. You might want to take this into consideration when choosing or creating your cover photo. On mobile, your profile photo will overlay your cover photo in the middle.

Facebook profile cover photo on mobile

A good rule-of-thumb is to avoid having any important details in the lower half of your cover photo that might be hidden behind your profile photo.

4. Facebook shows only about half of your cover photo when someone lands on your profile.

When someone navigates to your Facebook profile, Facebook would not show your entire cover photo immediately. She or he has to scroll up a little to see the full image.

Facebook profile cover photo

To encourage people to scroll up and check out your full cover photo, you might want to have something attractive enough in the bottom-half of your cover photo.

Facebook Page cover photo 820px x 462px

Facebook Page cover photo

We have a post that goes into more detail about the Facebook Page cover photo. Here are some of the key points:

1. Unlike your profile cover photo, nothing overlays your Facebook Page cover photo.

This is great because you don’t have to worry about anything blocking important details on your cover photo.

2. Like your profile cover photo, your Facebook Page cover photo will look slightly differenton mobile.

According to Facebook, your Facebook Page cover photo displays at 820 pixels wide by 312 pixels tall on desktops and 640 pixels wide by 360 pixels tall on mobile.

From my tests, I found that it’s best to use an image that is820 pixels wide by 462 pixels tall and to have what you wantto show up on thedesktop within a 820-pixels wide-by-312-pixels tall box (or the blue section).

Facebook cover photo on desktop and mobile

You can grab a template of the ideal Facebook Page cover photo here.

3. Use a PNG file for better resolution.

According to Facebook, if your cover photo has your logo or text, your logo or text might show up better when you use a PNG file.

Facebook Page cover video 820px by 465px

Buffer Facebook cover video

Yes! You can use a video for your cover photo. Isn’t that amazing?

Here are the recommendations by Facebook for your Facebook Page cover video:

  • Your video should be at least 820 pixels wide by 312 pixels tall. For best results, upload a cover video that’s 820 pixels wide and 456 pixels tall.
  • Your video should be between 20 and 90 seconds.

As for the video file format, I believeMP4 or MOV is recommended; though any of the formats on this list should work, too.

Facebook Group cover photo 820px x 462px

Facebook Group cover photo

The Facebook Group cover photo is almost identical to the Facebook Page cover photo – just a little shorter.

The ideal cover photo size is 820 pixels wide by 462 pixels tall (similar to the Facebook Page cover photo). But the area visible on thedesktop is 820 pixels wide by 250 pixels tall (slightly shorter than the Facebook Page cover photo). Your photo has to beat least 400 pixels wide and 150 pixels tall, according to Facebook.

Feel free to grab a template of the ideal Facebook Group cover photo here.

One thing to bear in mind is that while nothing overlays your Facebook Group cover photo on the desktop, your Facebook Group name will overlay your cover photo on mobile.

Facebook Group cover photo on mobile

Another thing you might want to think about is how your cover photo shows up in the Groups section of the Facebook mobile app.

Facebook Groups on mobile app

According to Marie Page, it’s best to have your copy in the center of your cover photo for the copy to show up nicely.

Facebook event photo 1920px by 1080px

Facebook event photo

The recommended size for the event photo, according to Facebook, is 1920 pixels wide by 1080 pixels tall (a 16:9 aspect ratio).

For a public event, anyone who views the event can see the event photo. For a private event, only people who are invited to the event can see the event photo.

Section separator

Ideal cover photo size for LinkedIn

LinkedIn profile background photo 1584px x 396px

LinkedIn background photo

1. The ideal aspect ratio is 4:1.

Your LinkedIn profile background photo is displayed at a 4:1 aspect ratio. LinkedIn recommends using photos that are 1584 pixels wide and 396 pixels tall.

If your background photo looks blurry after uploading, LinkedIn has some suggestions for you:

If your background image appears blurry or pixelated, please choose an image with a file size as close to the maximum as possible [8MB], as images with larger file sizes typically look better. Photos will also look better than images with logos. If your image is still blurry or pixelated, you may want to run it through a compression tool such as Trimage for Windows or ImageOptim for Mac before uploading it to LinkedIn.

2. LinkedIn will crop your background photo on mobile.

In its mobile app, LinkedIn will crop away the sides of your background photo, as seen in the screenshot below.

LinkedIn profile background photo on mobile

LinkedIn Company Page cover photo 1536px x 768px

LinkedIn Company Page background photo

1. LinkedIn will crop your cover photo on the desktop.

While LinkedIn recommends the dimensions of 1536 pixels wide by 768 pixels tall, it seems to crop away the top and bottom of the photo on the desktop, as seen in the screenshot above.

So it might be best to keep the important aspects of your photo to the middle of the photo if possible.

(The minimum dimensions required by LinkedIn is1192 pixels tall by 220 pixels wide.)

2. LinkedIn will show a bigger cover photo on mobile.

The reason LinkedIn recommends those dimensions might be because it displays a bigger cover photo in the mobile app.

LinkedIn Company Page background photo on mobile

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Ideal channel art size for YouTube

2560px x 1440px

YouTube channel art

1. Your channel art looks differently on the desktop, mobile, and TV.

The cover photo for your YouTube channel is known as the channel art.

Because YouTube can be viewed on a desktop, mobile, and even TV, your channel art will be displayed differently on different devices. The ideal dimensions that YouTube recommends are2560 pixels wide by 1440 pixels tall.

Here are a few more details to take note of:

  • Minimum dimension for upload: 2048 x 1152 px.
  • Minimum safe area for text and logos: 1546 x 423 px. Larger images may get cropped on certain views or devices.
  • Maximum width: 2560 x 423 px. This means that the safe area is always visible regardless of screen size. The areas to each side of the channel art are visible or cropped depending on browser size.
  • File size: 4MB or smaller.

YouTube has created an awesome channel art template that you can use to see how your channel art will look like on various devices.

YouTube channel art template

The template comes in a Photoshop file and a Fireworks file so you can overlay it on your image to get a sense of how your image will be cropped and displayed. Here’s an example that Ash created previously:

YouTube channel art template example

2. Be mindful of your profile image and channel links.

When you are creating your channel art, you might want to avoid having any important details in the upper-left and lower-right corners of your channel art.

That’s because your profile image and channel links will be placed on top of your channel art when viewed on the desktop and mobile.

Here’s how your channel art will look like on the desktop and mobile with your profile image:

YouTube channel art overlay

YouTube channel art overlay on mobile

For tips on optimizing your YouTube channel, you might like our guide on creating a YouTube channel.

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Ideal header photo size for Twitter

1500px x 500px

Twitter header photo

Twitter recommends that your header photo be 1500 pixels wide by 500 pixels tall – much wider than it is tall, compared to most cover photos.

It’ll be great to use an image that is wide enough to prevent Twitter from stretching the image and making it blurry.

1. Your profile photo overlays your header photo.

Just like your Facebook profile, your Twitter profile photo will cover a tiny part of your header photo. It’s great to be mindful of this so that your profile photo doesn’t cover anything important in your header photo.

2. Twitter allows you to reposition and scale your image.

Something nice about Twitter’s header photo is that Twitter allows you to reposition and scale the photo you uploaded to your liking.

Twitter header photo adjustments

3. Your header photo is slightly bigger on mobile.

On mobile, Twitter seems to show a little more of your photo on the top and bottom if it is tall enough. (Notice how you can see my shoes in the mobile header photo but not in the desktop header photo.)

Twitter header photo on mobile

If your header photo is 500 pixels tall (or shorter), Twitter might scale your photo up and crop a little of the sides away.

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Ideal cover photo size for Google+

Google+ profile and page cover photo 1600px x 900px

Google+ cover photo

Google+ cover photos seem to be displayed at 1084 pixels wide and 610 pixels tall, which is very close to the aspect ratio of 16:9. To ensure that your cover photo looks clear on your profile, it might be best to use an image that is 1600 pixels wide and 900 pixels tall.

1. Keep the important details in the middle of the cover photo.

Here’s something amazing about Google+ cover photos: they are responsive. Your cover photo will automatically crop as you scroll down the page so that the middle of the cover photo will always be in focus.

Google+ cover photo scroll

2. Google+ lets you crop your image according to its recommended dimensions

Moscow Deploys Facial Recognition to Spy on Citizens in Streets

Article URL: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-09-28/moscow-deploys-facial-recognition-to-spy-on-citizens-in-streets

Comments URL: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15359806

Points: 1

# Comments: 1


hnrss is a labor of love, but if the project has made your job

or hobby project easier and you want to show some gratitude, <a

href=”https://donate.hnrss.org/”>donations are very much

appreciated. PayPal and Bitcoin both accepted. Thanks!

Things to Learn from Uber’s Implosion

Article URL: https://eand.co/five-things-to-learn-from-ubers-implosion-a1a71aac6b0a

Comments URL: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15353722

Points: 14

# Comments: 13


hnrss is a labor of love, but if the project has made your job

or hobby project easier and you want to show some gratitude, <a

href=”https://donate.hnrss.org/”>donations are very much

appreciated. PayPal and Bitcoin both accepted. Thanks!